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Bright Brewers Yeast NEWS

De Novo Hybridization Approach Expands Diversity of Industrially Applicable Lager Yeast Strains with Unique Genome Composition

ABSTRACT | Lager beer is produced by Saccharomyces pastorianus, which is a natural allopolyploid hybrid between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus. Lager strains are classified into two major groups based largely on genomic composition: group I and group II. Group I strains are allotri-ploid, whereas group II are allotetraploid. A lack of phenotypic diver-sity in commercial lager strains has led to substantial interest in the reconstitution of de novo allotetraploid lager strains by hybridization of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus strains. Such strategies rely on the hy-bridization of wild S. eubayanus isolates, which carry unacceptable traits for commercial lager beer such as phenolic off-flavors and incom-plete utilization of carbohydrates. Using an alternative breeding strat-egy, we have created de novo lager hybrids containing the domesticated S. eubayanus subgenome from an industrial S. pastorianus strain by hybridizing this strain to a variety of S. cerevisiae ale strains. Five de novo hybrids were isolated that had fermentation characteristics similar to those of prototypical commercial lager strains but with unique phe-notypic variation due to the contributions of the S. cerevisiae parents. Genomic analysis of these de novo lager hybrids identified novel al-lotetraploid genomes carrying three copies of the S. cerevisiae genome and one copy of the S. eubayanus genome. Most importantly, these hy-brids do not possess the negative traits that result from breeding wild S. eubayanus. The de novo lager strains produced using industrial S. pas-torianus in this study are immediately suitable for industrial lager beer production. 

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Publication: MASTER BREWERS ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAS | TECHNICAL QUARTERLY | vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 106-116, Nov 2, 2021

Authors: Zachari Turgeon, Ryan C. Jurgens, Thomas Sierocinski, Cedric A. Brimacombe, Yiqiong Jin, Jessica M. Swanson, and John I. Husnik, Renaissance BioScience Corp., Vancouver, Canada

New Yeasts, New Beers: Non-GMO Technologies for New Beer Flavours (Part 3)

DESIGNING YEAST | In this concluding section of our three-part series (part 1 and 2 see BRAUWELT International No. 5, 2018, pp. 354-356 and No. 6, 2018, pp. 430-432) we outline the various non-GMO methods by which new brewer’s yeast are being created to drive beer flavour and aroma innovations. By applying the classical technique of selective breeding – used for millennia in the
domestication of species – it becomes possible to re-imagine brewer’s yeast, thereby enhancing and expanding yeast’s natural ability to define beer styles and flavours.

ANTON CHEKHOV famously wrote, “Knowledge is of no value unless you put it into practice.” In the last two articles in this series, the importance of yeast to the final sensory profile of beer was highlighted, an examination was made of how yeast produce these compounds, and an overview was provided of how brewers can modulate environmental, chemical and biological factors to produce the beers they desire. Sometimes however all the knowledge in the world is useless unless it is applied correctly. When it comes to beer that means starting with the right Saccharomyces yeast. Sometimes Mother Nature is kind and the right choice is already out there. If not, however, Saccharomyces yeast strains can be built from the ground up using classical, non-GMO yeast development techniques.

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Publication: BRAUWELT INTERNATIONAL | KNOWLEDGE | FERMENTATION AND MATURATION

Authors: Jason Hung, Associate Scientific Research Writer, Matthew Dahabieh, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer, Renaissance BioScience Corp., Vancouver, Canada

New Yeasts, New Beers: Non-GMO Technologies for New Beer Flavours (Part 2)

CONTROLLING YEAST | In the first part of this three-part article (BRAUWELT International No. 5, 2018, pp. 354-356), we outlined the enormous impact yeast has on the flavour and aroma profile of beer. In this second part, we discuss the variables and methods by which brewers can exert direct control over yeast during the brewing process. In the concluding article, we will examine the timehonoured, non-GMO classical development techniques by which new and exciting yeasts are being developed to help create whole new flavour and aroma profiles in beer.

OF ALL THE INGREDIENTS that contribute to a beer’s makeup, Saccharomyces yeast is quite simply the only one over which brewers have total control. While the selection and application of the right hops and malt is certainly important, in reality it is the farmer and maltster who ultimately control the growing conditions and final product quality of these ingredients. This means that brewers must put some faith into factors outside the brewery’s purview.

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Publication: BRAUWELT INTERNATIONAL | KNOWLEDGE | FERMENTATION AND MATURATION

Authors: Jason Hung, Associate Scientific Research Writer, Jessica Swanson, Lead Development Scientist, Scott Bohanna-Martin, Development Associate Brewer, Matthew Dahabieh, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer, Renaissance BioScience Corp., Vancouver, Canada

New Yeasts, New Beers: Non-GMO Technologies for New Beer Flavours (Part 1)

DESCRIBING FLAVOUR | Continuing our series on the topic Better Yeast, Better Beer, here we provide the first part of a three-part article explaining yeast’s significant potential in developing revolutionary new beer tastes and flavours to meet rising consumer demands for innovative beer tastes. In part two, we examine the many variables that brewers can exploit to modulate yeast impact on beer flavour and aroma. And finally, in part three, we explore the idea of developing novel brewer’s yeast strains, using classical non-GMO techniques, to help deliver better yeasts for better beer.

EXPERIENCING BEER has become a refined art for today’s savvy beer drinkers. Terms like “hoppy” have been replaced with descriptors such as “menthol”, “floral”, “citrus”, “woody aromatic” and “cream caramel”, to name a few. In fact, the palates of some beer enthusiasts are probably sophisticated enough that they could moonlight as professional sensory panelists. The divide between enthusiast and professional has narrowed remarkably, with many passionate beer drinkers ultimately starting up their own successful breweries.

The art and science of brewing has also become increasingly complex. While at its core brewing beer has remained unchanged for thousands of years, the modern brewer has at their disposal a deeper scientific understanding of brewing and fermentation, as well as advances in brewing technology that allow for precise control of the multitude of biological, environmental and chemical factors at work in the makeup of
a beer.

And brewers need every bit of help they can get, too. As the beer industry (specifically the craft market) matures, so does the beer consumer. The beer consumer today not only has a more cultivated palate but also, and importantly, a greater level of direct engagement with breweries via social media and beer ranking websites.

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Publication: BRAUWELT INTERNATIONAL | KNOWLEDGE | FERMENTATION AND MATURATION

Authors: Jason Hung, Associate Scientific Research Writer, Matthew Dahabieh, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer, Renaissance BioScience Corp., Vancouver, Canada